We Are knitters with attitude

Anonymous asked: How do you make the back of a knitting project look good? I always have floats everywhere..

madamedefargeknits:

meesh-stuff:

ladymac111:

linpatootie:

fannishknits:

The surest way to make the back of your knitting look as good as the front (if that’s what you’re going for) is to use a reversible stitch. If your problem is with your floats, then I would suggest having them no longer (wider?) than your SPI. So if you get, say, 4 stitches per inch with the yarn you’re using then your floats should be equal to 4 stitches.

Followers with suggestions feel free to chime in.

use the two-handed fair isle technique!! I love this technique and the back of the work looks lovely :)

https://www.philosopherswool.com/Pages/Twohandedvideo.htm

Another for two handed color work. BEST.

I do all my colorwork two handed.  I’ve found that it maintains tension well and is speedy.

i really prefer the two-handed method. it makes for speedy knits and a neater looking wrong side. the reverse side should look like a negative image of your stranded work.

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socialjusticekoolaid:

That CNN Anchor who said police should turn “water cannons” on the protesters… yeah, her ass is gone! #staywoke #cackling

That expression

(via thecorsetdiary)

What do you like to watch/listen to while you knit?

I binge watch stuff on netflix when knitting.

Lately I’ve been getting into shows that have lots of sweaters (the killing, twin peaks) but the best show that I watched while knitting this summer was the Inbetweeners. Good teen shows are SOOOOOO good.

(Source: fannishknits)

getting-knitfaced:

I am so obsessed right now with making a bulky weight sweater, it’s not even funny.

I want it to be giant and thick.

☠ chromatose ☢


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I got this yarn on impulse, thinking that maybe it would make a decent sweater. The very colorful yarn is made from mill ends by a small mill in michigan.

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The final sweater an almost overwhelming dose of color and I love it. Realistically, I’ll wear this with jeans, but the crazy pants do look good in the photos. Because of the fitting and nice finishing, it doesn’t look too artsy, hippyish or thrown together.

The process starts with yarn
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Then a sketch(theres some boring math in here that takes it from paper to reality, but nobody wants to hear about my spreadsheets).
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This whole thing took only a week. This is some of the best quality merino that I have ever used. It is perfect for sweaters that have a fitted shape and need a lot of elasticity and not a lot of drape.image


Here is a close up of some of the more interesting stripes. For the most part, the plies are all the same size, but a few are larger or smaller because it is made of scrap.

I am strongly considering writing up this pattern, all of the numbers are finished for sizes 30-46 with shaping for average bust size bust size. I’d like to write up my version for DD-H as well because so many women need this extra room (mine has it). Maybe even include an H+ version with princess darts, but who knows how many women need that.  It all depends on the response. 

Keep in mind that this can be done half and half in solid colors, in offset self striping yarns, or basically anything that you want to block with a split color on the front panel. It is a versatile layout.

If you have an interest, please comment.


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The pattern is like 70% done, written and everything, but I’m not going to spend time on layout and invest in tech editing if nobody takes interest. Maybe I would be looking for test knitters to do up some sweaters in other yarns. This would be so great in a Crazy Zauberball, Noro Silk Garden Sock, or 3-4 colors of Mad Tosh Pashmina among other things. 
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See my project on Ravelry and contact me about test knitting.
Also feel free to tell me if you think it is ugly, that helps too.
espphoto:

chunkyknitter:

espphoto:

Big Yarn Head

Where csn I buy yarn like this

My daughter spun a pound of this yarn out of a basic wool (tot ideal for against the skin) before realizing she was allergic to this wool. I do not know the yardage, but it was swatched once and we have pictures of the size of the swatch.
She has been hoping to sell this yarn because of her allergy. You should send me a message if you are interested. She may also be open to spinning more of this for you in a different wool type.

espphoto:

chunkyknitter:

espphoto:

Big Yarn Head

Where csn I buy yarn like this

My daughter spun a pound of this yarn out of a basic wool (tot ideal for against the skin) before realizing she was allergic to this wool. I do not know the yardage, but it was swatched once and we have pictures of the size of the swatch.

She has been hoping to sell this yarn because of her allergy. You should send me a message if you are interested. She may also be open to spinning more of this for you in a different wool type.

Machine Knitting Trip Part 2: Knitting

The 2 day intensive machine knitting course at the Textile Arts Center in Carroll Gardens was incredibly informative.The instructor, Mandy Kordal, Really knew her stuff, using a combination of demos and one on one instruction to make sure everyone was able to grasp the basics.


The facilities at this place are great. There were a huge number of looms, a dye room, the knitting machine space, industrial sewing machines, and what looked like a space for screen printing fabric. I would totally recommend checking it out.

In the beginner class, we learned a few different cast on and bind styles, a folded hem, needle positions, eyelets/decreases, increases, and some partial knitting. There was a packet handed out with resources and recaps of all the things we went over in the class. Though the 2 days was not enough time to get used to a lot of these new skills, the packet has been a great reference at home.

Here are a few more images of my swatches. They aren’t spectacular, but you can see things starting to happen. I am confident that I could now knit a tee shirt or tank with shaping and a rounded neck. This is a great improvement from struggling to cast on without jamming the carriage.
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Simple change of tension.
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A picot hem.
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Experimenting with changing stitch count, weight and gauge.
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Practicing multiple decreases and increases to make a step pattern. I am improving now an leaving less loops at the ends of the rows.
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2 rates of increase along the edge of a swatch (sideways). This leads me to believe that I am capable of making a raglan sweater pretty soon.

Since taking this class, I have been able to bring these skills home and apply the cast ons to the ribber. It is great to be able to do what I’ve been trying to do for such a long time. I have no doubt that the advanced class which focuses on garment making is just as worth while.

I will be positing a a few images of swatches next week when I have less work. Maybe even a little garment … To read about the shopping part of this trip, Go here.



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